Michigan city closes road to protect migrating salamanders | BR Shenoy

“Protecting the migration of Blue-spotted Salamanders is vital, as they are an indicator species that tell us about the health of our environment,” said Kathleen Henry, Special Projects Coordinator and Education Specialist. for the Superior Watershed Partnership. The mining journal in an email.

Blue-spotted salamanders are not endangered, but they are an indicator species that can alert people to the ecosystem. They are endemic to the Great Lakes Statesthe northeastand portions of Canada.

According to the Washington Post, a college student named Eli Bieri helped convince authorities to close a park road in Marquette, Michigan, every night until mid-April to ensure safe passage for salamanders.

Part of Peter White Drive in Almost Isle Park is closed to vehicular traffic, every evening at 8 p.m. Monday, March 21 through April 30, to allow its large population of Blue-spotted Salamander to migrate and breed safely. security. Only foot traffic is permitted in the area.

Study

According to a 2019 scientific evaluation of the road, 400 the salamanders have been killed by automobiles each year as they migrate to their breeding ponds from the park during the spring egg-laying season.

Another study indicated that only Three salamanders were killed off once road restrictions began in 2020.

Salamanders breed only at night, have black skin, and are less than six inches long, making them extremely difficult for motorists to notice.

Final Thoughts

The move proved so popular that the town now hosts a “Salamander Days” festival.

Salamander-watching excursions are now so common in Marquette that the town has chosen to host its first Salamander Days this spring, a six-week series of events that will include a salamander art exhibit and walks to learn about the amphibian environment.

The action illustrates how strategically placed road closures can allow humans and wildlife to live together with less friction.

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